34 Comments on “Freeze Remedy: Initial Assessments”

  1. I have a pretty big bird of paradise planted in ground and it looks pretty brown all over. What should I do?

  2. Are you going to do anything on hibiscus? Most of mine are not showing any good green color all the way to the soil. Should I give it some time?

  3. Hi, we have a mature Jacaranda tree in a backyard on Furman Ave that is at least 40 feet tall. It is on the south side of the lot. The tree is “bleeding” from the upper limbs, dropping wet sap onto the ground. There is also some leakage from the main trunks in areas. Do we watch for the bleeding to stop? Should we make plans to have the tree trimmed back? Have we lost the tree?

    1. Unprecedented event, so we don’t know how much damage. Might as well wait to see where healthy sprouts arise, could be halfway up, more likely all the way back to the ground.

  4. I have two vibernum bushes whose leaves are dark brown/ black, and they smell really bad. Should we trim them down, or are they dead? Thanks in advance for the feedback.

  5. Per my OD doctor, Jimmy is in need of eye protection when he is cutting.

    Oh, by the way, what about the varieties of palms that have gotten blasted due to the big freeze?
    Suggestions? Which species will make it, which won’t?

    Thanks

    1. We just stressed at this mornings landscape crew meeting that all crews were to have safety glasses aboard, and used. I think royals, foxtail, bottle palm are all toast. Queens palm and pygmy date palm will have large % losses. Mexican fan palms, guessing 60-80% survival. Texas and florida sabal, chinese and mediterranean fan palm, golden.

    1. Back in the 50s 60s 70s 80s, yards turn brown every winter because we would have a hard freeze maybe not quite as hard as this one but still a hard freeze. It’s just the last 20 years that we have gone without a freeze and the lawn has been green. So brown is not unusual or unexpected and it’s not a sign that the lawn needs water. Unless the ground is totally dry it’s better not to water as that could encourage fungus. You will mow the lawn maybe just one setting lower than usual and then wait until the soil is warm enough to start growth, at that time then you will resume with watering and do your first fertilization

    1. I think all foxtails are dead. Please report back to me if yours survive, I would want to know that.

  6. What about Mother in law tongues / Snake plants?? Mine looks bad and the dripping of the leaves has seemed to stop. Do I cut them back now or is it protecting possible growth underneath?? Hard to cut also. Any recommendations?

  7. What do you recommend we do with our orange drop irises? We have 4 large and 2 small, they are all grayish brown.

  8. What about miniature bottle brush? Leaves are silvery, not green and crispy, crunchy to touch. Should i cut back to remove old leaves?

  9. What I have seen so far is dead to ground. You may choose to wait and see if you get sprouts on trunk, or only from root.

  10. How do we treat plumaria? Tips were frozen. They are bent over and soggy. How can I find good tissue. Some bark has separated from the inner tissue and looks like paper.

  11. The only palm I haven’t seen you mention is the Sago palms. We have one that is at least 15 years old (maybe older). Should we take the same steps as in your palm video? Limbs are yellow and starting to droop.

    1. Sagos are not palms, but cycads, and are different. I would prune off dead leaves and hope for the best. It might take several months for new leaves to emerge.

  12. How do you know if a tree froze below the graft? Also, I did not see an answer to the plumeria question. Do you also scratch the trunk to determine where to cut back? Thanks for the info it is very helpful.

  13. If you can no longer tell where the tree was grafted, by a difference in bark color, or a “dogleg” then you might just have to say the first 8″ is likely rootstock, the next 4 ” is questionable, and above 12″ is likely good fruiting wood. But that would still be a guess.
    I can imagine a plumeria unprotected that is alive above ground, and I don’t think they will come out from below ground, but that is just a guess. Wait and observe for new growth, or decaying tissue. If it is shrunken and “gives” its probably dead, if it is full and firm it may be good, cut in the good if you have any

  14. I have caecelpinia, Norfolk Island pine, Mexican oleander, jacaranda, wild olive, giant Bird of paradise, Avocado, mango etc Trees they all look like they are dead or dying. Sagos from growing point coming back, avocado coming back half way up tree, giant bird trying to come back from ground also bananas back up almost 2’ .. lost plumerias left outside, green house was full, most desert rose, plumerias And other tropicals ok. Lost dragon fruit but cuttings I took ok. Tropical gingers in ground Trying to come back. Still Have plenty plumerias and desert rose, Buddha belly etc to sell .. took big hit but not is all lost.. I guess for most it is just waiting to see what’s going to come back. Biggest concern is jacaranda and Norfolk Island , also caecelpinia and Mexican oleander they all are 20 to 40 feet Tall and have been ground about 20 years. Thanks for all of your advice it is really appreciated.. thanks for any comments

  15. Forgot to mention bottle brush trees 10’ to20’ tall looks bad. Any info on those , will they come back from ground, not sure about those. All palms like robalini more than likely are dead. Grass coming back good.. mow twice fertilize..Thanks again

    1. Ron, I am expecting big bottlebrush trees to come back from the roots, but haven’t seen that happening yet. Still hoping. Lots of lost plants, but things will look much better by the end of summer.

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