Time For Tomatoes: Our Best Tips & Tricks

gillnurseryVeggies, Fruits, and HerbsLeave a Comment

Time To Get Tomatoes In The Ground!

Hopefully we have seen our last big cold snap of the season. And I did say “BIG” cold snap. Tomatoes need full sun for their entire growing season. Once frost is done, put them in a bed enriched with compost. A couple tablespoons of Rocket Fuelunder the roots will help your plants get off to a rapid start. Feed them with Espoma Plant Tone monthly through the growing season or Johns Recipe containing Fish emulsion, molasses and seaweed at least every two weeks. I like to put my tomatoes in a cage as soon as they are in the ground and wrap that cage with row cover fabric, top to bottom. Ours is called Grow Web (12ft x 16ft). Cut the fabric to size and cloths pin the sides together. The fabric will protect the plants from cold nights and more important harsh spring winds that can dry them out in no time. It doesn’t block water or sunshine. Remove the cloth when the plant reaches the top of the cage. If it starts blooming before then, remove the cover from the top of the cage and shake the cage gently whenever you walk by. That will encourage pollination from the top of the plant down to the bottom. Row cover can also be used to protect Peppers, Squash, Beans and all the tender spring vegetables in the garden. –DeAnna
 

Want to try something new?

How about a tiny building with a flowering roof nestled into your flowerbed, or veggie garden?  It could be a mini schoolhouse, a doghouse, or an outhouse!  This one is made from recycled

 silvery cedar fence boards and holds easy care succulents growing from its roof.  Place your planter on a concrete paver or brick to keep it off the ground.  You could try Petunias, Marigolds, Periwinkles, or Herbs and start a colorful village!

Merlien


Artemesia

James just planted “Powis Castle” Artemesia in our front bed on the corner of Catalina and Santa Fe. I love this perennial for its silver grey foliage and the beautiful backdrop it gives for annuals. Artemesia grows to about 3′ tall and 3′ wide; when it gets leggy, just cut it back and enjoy the quick flush of pretty foliage. James planted Rose Wave Petunias in the bed as well and this week he’s adding Techno Heat Dark Blue Lobelia; can’t wait

 for all the color!! I’ll share more photos as the plants grow!

 –Sally 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.