March Garden Guide

gillnurseryMonthly Garden Guide4 Comments



Lawn Care


Image
Weed Control
  • Spot treat existing weeds growing now with new, OMRI-certified organic Ortho GroundClear Weed and Grass Killer or Horticultural Vinegar, treating only the weeds. Either of these will burn all plant foliage.  
  • To prevent weeds, apply Bonide Weed & Crabgrass Preventer or Weed Beater Complete to help control existing weeds and prevent new ones.
  • Apply Weed-B-Gon for Southern Lawns or Image to kill the existing weeds once our weather warms up to 70-80 degrees with no rain for about 5 days. They are safe for Floratam & Raleigh St. Augustine and Bermuda. Give them 2 weeks to fully work and then it should be time to fertilize the lawn.
Fertilize
  • Fertilize when the grass is actively growing. Apply Gill Lawn and Garden 13-1-3, or Green Diamond 21-7-14 to your lawn. Water in well (approximately 30 minutes per area). Organic fertilizers such as Milorganite or Medina Growin’ Green will feed your lawn and soil with minimal watering. Lay new sod anytime, bermuda seed anytime this month.

Read: Treat For Take-All Patch in Lawns

Watch: How to Collect a Grass Sample




Plant

Most annuals and perennials can now be purchased as transplants this month. Here is a list of some of our favorites: (L-R) caladiums (plants and bulbs), larkspur, petunias, salvia, gerbera daisy, alyssum, false heather, celosia, lantana, coleus.


Image Image
Image Image
Image Image
Image Image
Image Image
Image
Vegetable Seeds

Beans, okra, radish, pumpkins, and watermelons, squash, cantaloupe, basil, corn

Image
Vegetable Transplants

Tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, squash, eggplant, and strawberries
Garden Guide: Vegetable Planting Dates

Image
Hardy Trees, Shrubs, Vines, Grasses

All hardy and tropical trees, shrubs, vines and grasses. I can’t think of one that can’t be planted now!

Image
Bulbs & Caladiums

Late spring and summer bulbs such as caladiums, and elephant ears

PLANT SPOTLIGHT
Money Tree aka Pachira aquatica

A fitting plant to feature with St. Patricks’ Day and well, we all could use a little good luck!

Image

Their braided trunks and leaves have symbolism for many to bring good luck & fortune to those who have them. They grow beautifully indoors under artificial light. Our Stacy in accounting has had one on her desk for months with not a leaf drop or blemish! They do great in moist humid areas-think baths or kitchens. Feed them once a month with ½ strength plant food.  Don’t get scared of its’ native size outdoors…60ft or more, indoors they max out around 4-6ft.



Fertilize


Image
  • AZALEAS, GARDENIAS, MAGNOLIAS

    Fertilize organically with Maestro Gro-Rose Glo or Espoma Azalea Tone, or conventionally with Miracle Gro ACR for Acid Loving Plants, Azalea Food.

  • HIBISCUS & TROPICAL BLOOMERS

    Fertilize all hibiscus and tropical bloomers organically with Maestro Gro-Rose Glo, or conventionally with Hibiscus Food.

  • ALL TREES & SHRUBS

    Fertilize organically with Milorganite, Medina Growin Green, or conventionally with Gill Lawn and Garden Fertilizer, Green Diamond Supreme Lawn Food.

  • ANNUALS & PERENNIALS

    Fertilize organically with Medina Growing Green, Hasta Gro, Maestro Rose Glo, or Plant Tone, or conventionally with Miracle Gro or Osmocote Time Release Granules.

  • ESTABLISHED ROSES

    Fertilize organically with Maestro Rose Glo or Plant Tone.

  • ESTABLISHED CITRUS TREES

    Fertilize organically with Medina Growing Green, Hasta Gro, or Citrus Tone, or conventionally (3 years or older) with ammonium sulfate 21-0-0 available in 4 to 40 Lb. bags.
    Read: Fertilize Your Citrus Now


All granular fertilizer should be watered in well.



Prune


Image
  • All dead and freeze damaged wood from hardy and tropical trees, shrubs, vines and perennials
  • All early spring bloomers such as azaleas, carolina jessamine, climbing roses, and indian hawthorns after they finish their bloom



Water


Image
  • Water all plants well after planting, and regularly through the first year. Plants will begin to use more water as they grow and bloom.
  • Outdoor potted plants dry out quickly, as do hanging baskets and small annuals.
  • Mulch all plants to help hold moisture.

Garden Guide: Good Water Practice for Established Trees, Shrubs, and Lawns



Image
Protect your Lawn from Oak Leaves

Live oaks are following their natural pattern of dropping old leaves before the new leaves come on. Now it’s time to get those oak leaves off your lawn before it suffocates the grass. Under large oaks, since the grass is often thin and stressed anyway because of shade, using a blower is less stressful on the weak turf than a rake.

4 Comments on “March Garden Guide”

  1. Thank you for the great reminders. I always look forward to reading about products and schedule suggestions for application. Brenda Hutchens

    1. There aren’t enough Shumard oaks in our area for me to be intimately acquainted with their time to bud, But for sure, everything is late this year. Winter was not too harsh, but the clouds and cool weather have stayed around way longer. Whenever they bud this year, it is not the typical time.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *